1 Notes

pearsonlabs:

5 things you may have missed on day two of the ASU+GSV Education Innovation SummitHere are 5 things you may have missed on day two of the ASU+GSV Education Innovation Summit:The day started strong with a panel called “How Four Rock Star Women Are Leading Their Schools Systems” - featuring Dr. Barbara Byrd Bennett, CEO, Chicago Public Schools; Cami Anderson, Superintendent, Newark Schools; Kaya Henderson, Chancellor of DC Public School; and Diane Tavenner, Founder and CEO of Summit Public Schools. Cami made a passionate argument for maintaining the same high standards and rigor for those students struggling most as we do for our best performing students. All of the women also agreed that we need to find effective ways to integrate smart phones and other personal devices into the classroom. Students use technology in all aspects of their life outside of the classroom, said Kaya, so why we would we ask them to unplug inside. Cami added that while her schools have faced challenges with allowing personal devices on the premises, with the right transformational leadership, there could be a solution on the horizon. Hadi Partovi from Code.org - the engine behind the popular “Hour of Code” intiative - gave a lunchtime talk about the importance of teaching kids computer science. “Note everyone needs to learn a coding language,” he said. “But everyone needs to understand how technology works.” He also announced the dates for the 2014 Hour of Code. Considering more girls participated in “Hour of Code’ in one week than tried computers science in the last 70 years, we’re pretty excited to see what 2014 has in store!In a lunchtime panel on the role of the VC community and opportunities in the sector, a panel concluded that edtech is an exciting ‘messy soup’ with more innovation, lower barriers of entry and at the same time greater competition and higher failure rates. Laela Sturdy from Google Ventures talked to the need to attract the best talent to the biggest problems and that the promise of personalised learning is one of the hardest engineering challenges. Mitch Kapor argued that great solutions will come from different and more diverse groups than the ones being funded right now and that we need to be able to identify talent wherever it comes from. Paul Maeder from Highland Capital said that VCs fund people that look like them and that although it is one of the most diversity challenged industries, the patterns are changing with the emergence of the next generation of talent in the industry.Stacey Childress and the Gates Foundation released their new survey, Teachers Know Best, which asked over 3,000 educators about what digital instructional tools are essential to helping their students be prepared for college and careers in the 21st century. Good news for the ASU+GSV audience: both teachers and the 1200+ students surveyed “see technology as useful in instruction.” Alignment with college- and career-ready standards and/or teachers’ lessons plans was the most-cited benefit sought by teachers when choosing instructional resources, both digital and non-digital.Former NBA star Magic Johnson gave the closing talk of the day, discussing life outside of basketball and some of his education initiatives, including supporting more than 10,000 minority students with college scholarships. When asked about his view on social impact investing, he said his mom taught him from a young age about the importance of giving back. “It’s not just about us being successful, it’s also about how many other people can you help be successful.”   

pearsonlabs:

5 things you may have missed on day two of the ASU+GSV Education Innovation Summit

Here are 5 things you may have missed on day two of the ASU+GSV Education Innovation Summit:The day started strong with a panel called “How Four Rock Star Women Are Leading Their Schools Systems” - featuring Dr. Barbara Byrd Bennett, CEO, Chicago Public Schools; Cami Anderson, Superintendent, Newark Schools; Kaya Henderson, Chancellor of DC Public School; and Diane Tavenner, Founder and CEO of Summit Public Schools. Cami made a passionate argument for maintaining the same high standards and rigor for those students struggling most as we do for our best performing students. All of the women also agreed that we need to find effective ways to integrate smart phones and other personal devices into the classroom. Students use technology in all aspects of their life outside of the classroom, said Kaya, so why we would we ask them to unplug inside. Cami added that while her schools have faced challenges with allowing personal devices on the premises, with the right transformational leadership, there could be a solution on the horizon. Hadi Partovi from Code.org - the engine behind the popular “Hour of Code” intiative - gave a lunchtime talk about the importance of teaching kids computer science. “Note everyone needs to learn a coding language,” he said. “But everyone needs to understand how technology works.” He also announced the dates for the 2014 Hour of Code. Considering more girls participated in “Hour of Code’ in one week than tried computers science in the last 70 years, we’re pretty excited to see what 2014 has in store!In a lunchtime panel on the role of the VC community and opportunities in the sector, a panel concluded that edtech is an exciting ‘messy soup’ with more innovation, lower barriers of entry and at the same time greater competition and higher failure rates. Laela Sturdy from Google Ventures talked to the need to attract the best talent to the biggest problems and that the promise of personalised learning is one of the hardest engineering challenges. Mitch Kapor argued that great solutions will come from different and more diverse groups than the ones being funded right now and that we need to be able to identify talent wherever it comes from. Paul Maeder from Highland Capital said that VCs fund people that look like them and that although it is one of the most diversity challenged industries, the patterns are changing with the emergence of the next generation of talent in the industry.Stacey Childress and the Gates Foundation released their new survey, Teachers Know Best, which asked over 3,000 educators about what digital instructional tools are essential to helping their students be prepared for college and careers in the 21st century. Good news for the ASU+GSV audience: both teachers and the 1200+ students surveyed “see technology as useful in instruction.” Alignment with college- and career-ready standards and/or teachers’ lessons plans was the most-cited benefit sought by teachers when choosing instructional resources, both digital and non-digital.Former NBA star Magic Johnson gave the closing talk of the day, discussing life outside of basketball and some of his education initiatives, including supporting more than 10,000 minority students with college scholarships. When asked about his view on social impact investing, he said his mom taught him from a young age about the importance of giving back. “It’s not just about us being successful, it’s also about how many other people can you help be successful.”   

4 Notes

pearsonlabs:

5 Things You May Have Missed on Day One of the ASU+GSV Education Innovation SummitHere are 5 things you may have missed on an action packed day one of the ASU+GSV Education Innovation Summit in Scottsdale, Arizona:

1. The big news yesterday was the announcement that InBloom will be winding down over the coming months and the organisation’s CEO Iwan Streichenberger, on a student privacy panel, had the opportunity to respond to the news. He defended its privacy and security standards and argued that the losers would ultimately be the parents and students. Fellow panelist U.S. Department of Education office of technology Director Richard Culatta, argued that private companies need to do a better job of explaining their privacy policies to students and parents in plain English.

2. Michael Horn from the Clayton Christensen Institute hosted a lively discussion and feedback session for educators at the event. Discussion covered the most useful data, new assessment methods, the hacks that teachers use to make technology work for them in the classroom, the dramatic shift to BYOD in the last 18 months, the fact that kids don’t need keyboards and are now far more comfortable working with their cell phones or mobiles. Integration of technologies was considered to be the holy grail. 

3. In his session “You are Making Bad Education Faster and More Efficient,” Google’s Education Evangelist Jaime Casap spoke to a packed room about the need to create digital leaders, who are not just consumers but people who take ownership of their digital footprint. He also reminded the group that while technology remains an enabling capability, like desks or electricity, it’s also giving us the world’s knowledge at our fingertips and as he put it: “it’s time to freak out” about that.

4. Florida Governor Jeb Bush gave the closing keynote of the day emphasizing the need for high standards, choice and a focus on outcomes in education - stating “if our people are not rising, our nation will not rise.” He also highlighted the innovative work of four edtech startups - Edmodo, Remind101, LearnZillion and Florida Virtual School, whose founder, Julie Young, he called the “godmother of digital learning”.

5. At the Pearson learning lounge, successful Catalyst alumni gave presentations on their products and experiences of being part of the virtual accelerator programme. They will be back today. Do drop by to say hello and to grab possibly the biggest cookies in Arizona.

pearsonlabs:

5 Things You May Have Missed on Day One of the ASU+GSV Education Innovation Summit

Here are 5 things you may have missed on an action packed day one of the ASU+GSV Education Innovation Summit in Scottsdale, Arizona:
1. The big news yesterday was the announcement that InBloom will be winding down over the coming months and the organisation’s CEO Iwan Streichenberger, on a student privacy panel, had the opportunity to respond to the news. He defended its privacy and security standards and argued that the losers would ultimately be the parents and students. Fellow panelist U.S. Department of Education office of technology Director Richard Culatta, argued that private companies need to do a better job of explaining their privacy policies to students and parents in plain English.
2. Michael Horn from the Clayton Christensen Institute hosted a lively discussion and feedback session for educators at the event. Discussion covered the most useful data, new assessment methods, the hacks that teachers use to make technology work for them in the classroom, the dramatic shift to BYOD in the last 18 months, the fact that kids don’t need keyboards and are now far more comfortable working with their cell phones or mobiles. Integration of technologies was considered to be the holy grail.
3. In his session “You are Making Bad Education Faster and More Efficient,” Google’s Education Evangelist Jaime Casap spoke to a packed room about the need to create digital leaders, who are not just consumers but people who take ownership of their digital footprint. He also reminded the group that while technology remains an enabling capability, like desks or electricity, it’s also giving us the world’s knowledge at our fingertips and as he put it: “it’s time to freak out” about that.
4. Florida Governor Jeb Bush gave the closing keynote of the day emphasizing the need for high standards, choice and a focus on outcomes in education - stating “if our people are not rising, our nation will not rise.” He also highlighted the innovative work of four edtech startups - Edmodo, Remind101, LearnZillion and Florida Virtual School, whose founder, Julie Young, he called the “godmother of digital learning”.
5. At the Pearson learning lounge, successful Catalyst alumni gave presentations on their products and experiences of being part of the virtual accelerator programme. They will be back today. Do drop by to say hello and to grab possibly the biggest cookies in Arizona.

1 Notes

Weibo, WeChat and the Future of Chinese Social Media | The Percolate Content Marketing Blog

Notes

Top 10 Things We Learned at SXSW Edu | Pearson Labs

SXSW 2014, you’ve been amazing! We’ve met so many great people, seen some incredible things and have come away more positive than ever about the future of education. The festival was too big to cover everything in a single post, but as a starting point, here’s 10 of the things we’ve learnt last week.

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#SXSWeduparty gif goodness #sxswedu

#SXSWeduparty gif goodness #sxswedu

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Via contently

Via contently

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How the web is sending the world Gaga

In ‘Blockbusters: Why Big Hits - And Big Risks - are the Future of the Entertainment Business,’ Anita Elberse argues that Chris Anderson’s ‘long tail theory’ was just a nice idea. In reality we aren’t seeing more diversity and choice and digital media is simply boosting the economic ‘blockbuster’ power of the biggest entertainment brands - superhero movies, football clubs and celebs like Lady Gaga.   

Warner Bros have a strategy whereby they focus on a smaller number of big bets or ‘tent-pole’ movies every year, throw an awful lot of marketing money at them. And let the cash flow in. The downside is that if they fail, it’s failure on a massive scale. Think Disney’s John Carter (which I actually really liked).

Here’s a great fact about the music industry - in 2011 a third of sales were of songs that sold just one copy. The blockbuster investment went into 100 songs that sold more than one million each. Gaga is the best example of this mega-marketing led music phenomenon. 

What are the lessons for the corporate world? It’s clear that the mega brands such as Coca Cola and Ford will continue to shift advertising spend into powerful content marketing through social channels, growing massive and mainstream audiences. 

In my world on a smaller scale, I think it reinforces the need to focus on and invest in fewer, bigger communications campaigns for greater cut through. And in a smaller number of social channels we can really scale, finding the right balance between focus and niche content areas. 

Notes

Eye-catching creative from the @ftweekend's new global advertising campaign. 

Eye-catching creative from the @ftweekend's new global advertising campaign. 

Notes

Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life …Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition.
Steve Jobs

Notes

Being a parent is very much like being a Burmese politician. It’s house arrest and the only contact you have with the outside world is CBeebies. Men who grew up in the Seventies have had to evolve more in 40 years than in the previous 40,000.
Frank Skinner in The Times

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